Book Review – Miserable @ Work

  

Miserable @ Work by Dr. Will Miller

Humor, misery and work rarely fit together so easily as they do with this light-hearted look at what’s really troubling many people in America today. I don’t want to spoil the fun for readers, so I’ll just say what many may already intuitively know. The misery ain’t all about the work!

One example of the humor injected into this book is a quote about the lack of exercise when the author was younger. “The whole time I was growing up, I never once heard any of the adults in my life use the words, ‘abs, pecs, glutes or reps.’ Complimenting someone on their abs could easily get you kicked in your glutes.”

The topic of workplace misery is one that will be of interest to anyone who feels like they’ve lost the joy they once had in their profession, as well as to leaders who wish to help those they lead find more engagement in their work. There’s no doubt that happy employees are more productive, which affects the bottom line; however, there’s a higher calling for most leaders who genuinely want their employees to see value in what they do for a majority of their waking hours.

The book balances good advice based on Dr. Will’s life experiences with solid support based on academic research. This approach helps overcome the naysayers who may suffer from self-help fatigue.

This short and relatable book is one that I’ll be sharing with those I lead as well as a few peers I thought of while reading the book over a recent weekend.

The book builds upon the common-sense advice Dr. Will argues for in his previous book, Refrigerator Rights. Other books and information from Dr. Will are available at www.drwill.com

This book review was completed by Alvin Plexico, PhD. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I was not compensated for this review, nor was I asked to write a positive review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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