Leaders Eat Last (Book Review)

Book Review: Leaders Eat Last by Simon Sinek

My daughter loaned me this book after she read it as part of her leadership training in the U.S. Air Force. With a Ph.D. in business, focused on organizational leadership, along with a few decades of leadership experience in the U.S. Navy, I’ve read a lot of leadership books. Leadership is my passion, which is why I took an interest in this book, and why I can offer my highest recommendation to anyone who wants to learn more about this important, timely, and relevant subject.

I appreciated the historical perspective offered by Sinek. Growing up in the 70s and 80s, I felt like I was viewing that period of time through a different lens based on the eloquent way in which Sinek shares how leadership decisions made during that period influenced our nation and the world for many generations. Some of the repercussions from those decisions are still being felt today.

I also appreciated the scientific approach that Sinek took when describing the physical reactions we experience from the chemicals serotonin, oxytocin, dopamine, and endorphins. Most of us are familiar with these physical chemical reactions; however, Sinek provides a very interesting approach to exploring how they influence teams and their leaders. Some of the details in this section began to get a little deep for my tastes, but overall, the information was presented in an interesting and informative manner.

Finally, I enjoyed the practical applications offered, especially those related to millennials. As the national director for Navy media outreach, I work with millennials every day at our headquarters near Memphis and interview millennials serving in the Navy around the world. There’s some disagreement about the accuracy of generational descriptions, but based on Sinek’s explanations, I believe he does a good job of describing the unique nature of millennials without over-generalizing the individuals who now make up the largest segment of our U.S. population.

As a lifelong learner, I’m always open to new approaches to subjects upon which I have some expertise. Leaders Eat Last is a great example of how this open approach can pay off for leaders who refuse to grow too old to learn new tricks.

This book review was completed by Alvin Plexico, PhD. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I was not compensated for this review, nor was I asked to write a positive review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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Book Review – Miserable @ Work

  

Miserable @ Work by Dr. Will Miller

Humor, misery and work rarely fit together so easily as they do with this light-hearted look at what’s really troubling many people in America today. I don’t want to spoil the fun for readers, so I’ll just say what many may already intuitively know. The misery ain’t all about the work!

One example of the humor injected into this book is a quote about the lack of exercise when the author was younger. “The whole time I was growing up, I never once heard any of the adults in my life use the words, ‘abs, pecs, glutes or reps.’ Complimenting someone on their abs could easily get you kicked in your glutes.”

The topic of workplace misery is one that will be of interest to anyone who feels like they’ve lost the joy they once had in their profession, as well as to leaders who wish to help those they lead find more engagement in their work. There’s no doubt that happy employees are more productive, which affects the bottom line; however, there’s a higher calling for most leaders who genuinely want their employees to see value in what they do for a majority of their waking hours.

The book balances good advice based on Dr. Will’s life experiences with solid support based on academic research. This approach helps overcome the naysayers who may suffer from self-help fatigue.

This short and relatable book is one that I’ll be sharing with those I lead as well as a few peers I thought of while reading the book over a recent weekend.

The book builds upon the common-sense advice Dr. Will argues for in his previous book, Refrigerator Rights. Other books and information from Dr. Will are available at www.drwill.com

This book review was completed by Alvin Plexico, PhD. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I was not compensated for this review, nor was I asked to write a positive review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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